Playing w/ the Occupational Employement Statistics Data-Set:

Standard

I found some data-sets on Occupational Employment Statistics on Bureau of Labor Statistics site and I played with it to see if I can find something interesting:

Few things about the data & visualization that I am going to share

  • US only
  • I downloaded the national level data But there’s also state level data available if you’re interested to drill down.
  • The reports that you see where created after I got a chance to “clean” the data-set a bit and created a data model that suited basic reporting on top of it.
  • For this blog post, I am going to play w/ May 2010 & 2011 data
  • With the help of original data-set, you can drill down to get statistics about a particular Job Category if you want. For this blog-post, I am going to share visualizations that correspond to Job categories.
  • click on images to see the higher resolution image.

With that, Here are some visualizations:

1) Job Category VS mean hourly salary:

1 Job category vs hourly salary mean bureau of labour statistics

2) Job Category VS number of employees:

2 Job category vs number of employees bureau of labour statistics

3) Scatter Plot:

X Axis: Number of employees

Y – Axis: Wage (Mean Hourly Salary May 2011)

Size of Bubble: Wage (Mean Hourly Salary May 2011)

*Note: This may not be the best approach to create the Scatter Plot as I have used the same value (Mean Hourly Salary May 2011) twice – But since I was just playing w/ it, I went with what I had in the model.

Here’s the visualization:

3 scatter plot number of employees vs mean hourly wage may 2011 employment statistics

Some of the things I observed:

1) I belong to an Industry (Computer and Mathematical occupations) which has relatively higher mean hourly wage.

2) There are few people working in “farming, fishing & forestry occupations” that do not get paid much.

3) There are lots of people working in “office administrative support occupations” that do not get paid much.

4) Management Occupations, Legal Occupations and computer & mathematical occupations have relatively higher mean hourly wages.

Conclusion:

In this post, I played w/ Occupational Employment statistics data-sets and shared some visualizations.

Advertisements

One thought on “Playing w/ the Occupational Employement Statistics Data-Set:

Thank this author by sharing the article on social media. If you have any questions or comments, please leave a reply below:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s